MEDICAL DISCLAIMER

The information contained on this website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding any medical condition, or before beginning any exercise program

Toll Free Senior Line 

 

The toll-free Seniors Information Line provides  a traditional method of speaking with a bilingual, customer-service oriented telephone agent. For basic information on government programs and services for seniors, their families and caregivers please contact:

1-855-550-0552

Tele-Care

 

If you or someone you know requires non-urgent health advice or information, call Tele-Care. A registered nurse will assess your needs and provide information, education and/or advice as required. For access to this confidential and bilingual toll-free telephone service, 24 hours a day, seven days a week please dial:

8-1-1

For medical emergencies, immediately call  911  or visit your local emergency department.

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Addressing Dizziness

There are various types of dizziness with many potential causes. Older adults should be encouraged to tell their doctor if they feel dizzy or light-headed. The three main types of dizziness are vertigo (false sense of motion/ often described as a spinning or whirling sensation), disequilibrium (feeling off-balance or wobbly) and pre-syncope (feeling lightheaded, going to black-out or faint). Many older adults, though, are hard to categorize and/or have more than one type of dizziness.

Medications can cause dizziness, so caution is required every time a new medication is started. Some medications can affect the balance mechanism in the ear (e.g., some antibiotics), while others lower blood pressure with standing and cause light-headedness. Dizziness can occur with analgesics (e.g., opioids such as morphine), medications for depression or mood problems, drugs used for bladder problems, seizure medicines, muscle relaxants and drugs for Parkinson’s disease. Concerns about dizziness being from one or more medications should be discussed with the physician, pharmacist, or nurse practitioner.

Dehydration can also make older adults feel dizzy. Older adults often do not drink enough fluids. Most people can safely drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluids including water each day. Clients with heart failure, or those on water pills, should talk to their healthcare provider about how much fluid they should drink.

 

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